Why we keep stuff

Due to my frequent moving through Europe, I’m often confronted with the question why I, why people in general, keep stuff. Travelling is soooo much easier with 1-2 bag and as long I don’t live forever in a place with a massive warehouse attached, most things are a pain in the butt, really. So why don’t I chuck them away, getting rid of the forever? I try to examining this question by sorting all my possessions in categories and than, trying to find the reasons why I keep these things. All that with the aim, to question these reasons and give these things away, at last. Or in other words, distinguish the really useful possessions from the less useful ones.
OK, let’s get started:

  1. potential use (e.g. books you’ve already read , Australian cattle lead, special wrench)
    You know, one day in your life, you’ll need them.
    Problem: That day, you won’t find them among all the other potential helpers respectively clutter. That is, these things don’t have any use for you, you can easily give them away.
    Solution: That special day, when you actually need them (if it comes, at all), borrow them from someone. (You can even try to remember, who you gave yours)
  2. books to read (all the books you got last christmas, also newspaper articles you cut out and these free magazines you picked up somewhere)
    They are all VERY EXCITING. You want to read the NOW.
    Problem: You don’t have time NOW. Later, you might not be that interested anymore and you’ll definitely got something new, hotter. Also, new, exciting texts are published every hour, they are abundant as solar power.
    Solution: Get rid of all of them. In case, you actually end up with nothing to read and the internet isn’t an option, go to the library. If you’re really desperate, you could even go to a book shop and sell the book again, after you read it.
  3. representatives (e.g. pocket edition of the universal declaration of human rights, travel guide of a former journey)
    The use of things from this category is hard to decipher, in fact, there’s none. No practical one, anyway. In my case, I carry around this amnesty international pocket edition of the universal declaration of human rights. They remind me, that I value human rights and think that ai is a cool organisation.
    Problem: Every time I need to look up an article for a paper or so, I’ll use the internet. It’s much faster.
    Solution: Again, give it away (do some propaganda!). I’m still a member of ai, even if I give away all there material.
  4. Unused gift (e.g. your 4th bottle opener, an ugly piece of cloth)
    Someone gave you something of which you know, you’ll never ever use it. With the unused gift we are entering the categories of psychological terror.
    Problem: You think you will insult your dear friend by chucking it away.
    Solution: Appreciate the kindness of your friend and pass that thing to someone, who actually is in need of it. You’re friend might not even remember that thing. If (s)he does, tell him or her the truth. True friends appreciate your decision, they wouldn’t want to hold any psychological power over you.
  5. confession of a bad buy (something you bought but never used)
    You bought something (it seemed to be a bargain at that point), but than, you never had an occasion to use it.
    Problem: By discarding that thing, you confess that you made a mistake.
    Solution: Live with it, everyone makes mistakes. By the time you give it away, it’ll stop bothering your soul. Forever.
  6. witnesses of the past (class pictures, stamp collection from your childhood)
    Things you kept for ages and which gather almost religious dust.
    Problem: These things represents stages from your live and you think you’ll denial parts of your personality by chucking this kind of clutter away. On the other hand, these things can be a heavy, psychological burden. You progressed since that particular stage and they just hold you back in your further development.
    Solution: Accept that you are the person that your are now and appreciate your life at the moment, be open for new things and don’t waste too much time (and space in your shelf/bag) with your past. Light all that shit. It’s liberating.

Identify your stuff makes it way easier to get rid of it. And never forget:

Out of sight, out of mind.

PS: Did I forget a category? Do you own something without knowing why, but it  just won’t fit in the aforementioned system? Do you want to keep your love letters? Why? Let me know.