Archive for the ‘Johann Strube’ Category

the student in the time vortex

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

2013 is about to close and it’s time to write something clever on my blog. Oh my, half a year has passed again since I wrote my last entry. Guess I’m not much of a blogging person. Or rather, I’m in a stage of my life, where I do make progress in certain areas, namely my studies and students’ association (ÖH) activism, but unlike in music, where you have concerts and releases, there are not so many stunning events that I feel eager to write about. Or when they happen, I’m too tired and torn to be bothered. It feels like in Doctor Who’s time vortex; I chase through time and space with tunnel vision and without contemplation.

When I look back at the first months in office, there are several things I should be proud of: We (my colleagues in the chair team and several other activists of ÖH) established two new units within the students’ association, organized a number of seminars and political/informative events, organized a huge demonstration against the union of the ministry of science and the ministry of economy and, most importantly, seemed to be able to create a general sense of motivation within the student body for ÖH affairs. Also, we created a lot of confusion. Something, I’m not entirely discontent about.

As with my studies, officially I’m still in Bachelor stage but practically halfway through my masters. Which is kind of cool, ’cause it give’s me the choice of being done soon or stretch the end a bit to get some time for my own, artistic, political and/or scientific (I don’t attempt to separate these areas to much) projects. Yeah, my head is still bursting with ideas that needs watering.

tldr: wibbly wobbly timey wimey happy new year

And suddenly they called me chairperson

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Looks like it took me 6 months to write another entry on my blog.  Not like I’ve been lazy, far from it. I’ve just been caught up with tons of stuff, I didn’t even remember I had a blog. Sort of…

The single most exciting event was the election for the Student Union parliament. The election itself was exciting, but so was the preparation and aftermath. Admittedly, our green student group (bagru*GRAS*boku) was pretty much in a state of coma since the last election in 2011. We didn’t die, the heart was still beating, we were just dozing. That is to say, me and a fellow student were members of that student’s parliament and did get involved there, but other than that, it was pretty much green radio silence. Anyway, something must have struck us, as we decided to run again this year and even do some campaigning. A small group as we are, I confess it was one of the most intense campaigns I took part in. But it was great to see our group become alive again and even better, we managed to maintain our two seats in the student’s parliament. Still better, we were suddenly a much asked for coalition partner for the two bigger student’s group. Therefore, no relaxation after the election but coalition talks! I tell you, that stuff is exciting. Everything went pretty smooth, though, and now, hooray, we’re part of the executive coalition with the so-called Unabhängige Fachschaftsliste, a rather odd collection of campus activists, that came together in deadly terror of joining any party-affiliated group. Nice bunch of people, though. Long story short, I’m now part of the chairteam of our Student Union, which is not far from a full-time occupation. It’s going to be extremely intense, busy and challenging plus awesome. So I assume. It was interesting to realize, how nice and polite suddenly everyone becomes, once you’re get into some sort of exposed office. Wonder how long that will last…
Another year, another challenge.

Apart from all those political activities, I also managed to make some progress on my studies. I’m like on the finishing line of my Bachelor graduation. The most interesting part was the field research for my Bachelors thesis (more on that, once it’s proof-read, handed in and graded), which took my to the Vinschgau in South Tyrol, Italy. It was quite a relief and change to get out of Vienna for 2 weeks.

studying in Vienna: in praise of a dying system

Saturday, December 1st, 2012

It’s been almost two years since I moved to Vienna to study landscape planning and architecture at the University of life sciences and Natural Resources. Most likely, I’ll stay here for grad school and there’s a reason, why I think studying in Vienna is great (at least for people like me):First of all, as a EU-citizen, it’s free as long I stay in the regular period of study plus two semesters which shouldn’t be a problem. With my German Abitur, I could just walk up to almost any university (there are nine of them), enroll and start studying. Just like that. Even better, I can study more than just one program at several universities at the same time. So I enrolled for spatial planning at the Vienna University of Technology. I just jump on my bike and commute between classes at two different universities at which I don’t pay a single cent of tuition. I have a great amount of freedom to tailor my studies to my own interests, style and pace of learning. It’s education heaven, right? Well, close but not quite there…

Since until recently (after I enrolled, that is) Austrian universities had no tool to control the amount of their students. More often than not, this would lead to overrun programs with the universities being unable to provide sufficient facilities for all their enrolled students. It’s not too bad at my programs, even though it does get cramped in the lecture halls once in a while. The computer facilities are a joke. I had the opportunity to see some universities in the US and god, they had some shiny facilities, gorgous libraries and what not. But is that worth paying something like 20-30k a year? Not for me. I have my own computer, I don’t need a palace for studying and they have some great professors over here. You might not get invited to their homes, but you can still learn a lot from them if you’re commited. It’s actually not that difficult to get a decent education and set yourself apart from the mass of students as long you’re commited to your studies. So for me, it pans out nicely.

But wait, things have changed. They’re trying hard to reduce the number of students. Introduction of study fees for long-time students and non-EU students and limits of students for some programs (including landscape architecture). And while those restrictions are still very modest by international standarts, experiences from other countries such as the UK have shown, that it will become tougher and tougher to study in Austria if those attempts aren’t tackled now. Kill it before it grows. I want future generations of students to have the same degree of freedom while studying that I have now. As a start, you should join the demonstration for free education organised by the Austrian Student’s Union on the 5th of December.

Walden’s nightmare

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Recently, I’ve been asked to perform at the opening of the latest exhibition by the Viennese artist group annalian. Unfortunately, I had to do some field research in Styria so I couldn’t be around. So I set up a private and cozy performance at my home, recorded the result and gave it to annalian. The exhibition took place in some old bunker in Vienna. I would have loved to hear the pulsing bass down there.

Anyway, since it is recorded now, I might as well share it with you. Enjoy and let me know what you think.

How to put things off you can’t do anything about now

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

As I am working myself  through my undergraduate programme in landscape architecture and planning, I am already thinking about which master to take. There are a couple of options I find intriguing:

Coming to a decision is only part of the problem. It’s still more than a year left until I actually have to make that decision, in fact, it won’t be before December I can apply to anything. There’s absolutely nothing I can do about it right now and yet this pondering is nagging my mind to no end, taking up way to much brain power which I rather invested on other things. So today’s big question is, how to put off something that is bothering you, but which you can not do anything about at the moment. Basically, I want to put it into a mental hold-file, erase it from my mind and follow up on it in autumn. I know how to do it with a file on my hard-drive, but my brain doesn’t work like that. Any suggestions? I might continue this article whenever I came up with a solution, which I don’t at the moment, because…which master programme should I take again?

edit, half a year later: Over the course of the last 6 month that list expanded to about 20 extremely interesting master programs I’ve been considering. However, coming back to University in fall made me realize the advantages of my current program. All those other masters, tempting, but not better suited for my overall goal to plan sustainable communities than the course I’m already taking. It’s like walking down the aisles in a department store, when all the shiny products left and right of you are grabbing your attention while their’s only one product in the whole store you’re  actually need. Ehh, I forgot how much I hate department stores…

three months in the USA. a conclusion

Monday, September 26th, 2011

edit: After having spent another 3 months in the US (summer 2014) and having re-read this entry, I feel a little different about the things I wrote 3 years ago. I’m not saying it’s wrong, it is just overly generalizing. For everything I wrote their are counter-examples. There’s more to say…
Despite all of that, I won’t go about editing it. Just see it as an account of an European traveller being in the US for the first time.

 

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I moved out my flat in Vienna in June to spend the summer with my girlfriend in Pennsylvania and to see a couple of places and friends on the way. With two days left in this country, I’m surprised to realize I’m sad to leave. In fact, I got quite attached to this country. This is why:

  • The boundlessness of the USA is legendary. That is what I assumed it to be, a legend. An illusion. I was proofed wrong. Once you’re in – which turned out to be much easier then expected – an area just slightly smaller than and as geographically diverse as Europe is waiting for you to be explored. Even though border controls are history in the European Schengen area, you can clearly feel the national borders. Language and cultural differences are fine, but separate train and bus networks aren’t. I don’t even mention different tax system, health insurance and phone networks. In the states, all that doesn’t bother you the slightest. Off you go. It is an incredible feeling of freedom, that you could travel/move to a tropical island, an isolate glacier, a Mediterranean climate or whatever else may cross your mind and all you had to do is to pack your things and get going.
  • The USA is an incredibly culturally diverse country. You would say, Europe has all the different languages and cultures in its different countries. Well, every major American city has all that in their neighborhoods. And it doesn’t stop at Littly Italy or the Irish community. Chinatown is ’round the corner…
    Yes, there is inequality between the different origins and there is xenophobia. The general attitude, however, is that you are welcome in this country to achieve what you want. Most people are at least 3rd generation immigrants and in fact, the stories of people that came to this country to start a new life, are at the heart of the American myth.
  • So are stories of personal achievement. Even though only a small fraction of the people that arrived on this continent actually made it from a dishwasher to a millionaire, many started small businesses or farms. Unlike in many other places, success isn’t necessarily confronted with envy or at least suspicion, but admiration. I wouldn’t be surprised, if this attitude may occasionally turn into terror, if one decides not to do anything. But that’s not really an issue for me.
  • Very obviously, the USA are a gorgeous place. I dedicated most of my writing and photography on my travel journal to the countless natural beauties and spectacular cities.
  • The biggest surprise to me was the high quality and deliciousness of American cooking. Yes, there is a lot of awful junk food, but you’ve got a choice. Be it a Chinese restaurant in NYC, seafood at Jersey shore, soul food in the south, an Italian restaurant in Boulder, CO or any of the countless, tiny diners down the road. Never in my life I had such a good food for affordable prices than here.
  • Obviously I am sad to leave my girlfriend for a couple of months, but I don’t intend to discuss my personal dilemma on this blog.

It is not all good.

  • The strong individualism often comes with recklessness. A lot of people will drive SUVs or other overdimensioned vehicles, just because “they can,” not caring about climate change and global responsibility. Many hate paying taxes and social insurance contributions, ignoring the situation of people with less luck.
  • The religious right of the US is frightening to say the least. The way how certain politicians and media people agitate against homosexuals, Muslims or the social state is revolting.
  • A lot have been said and written about the double standards in American politics, which question the grandness of the US rather a lot. I try not to judge a country by its politics alone, even though I’m aware, that they represent the general zeitgeist of their voters at least to some extend.
All in all, my 3-month stay in the USA gave me a much deeper insight in this country and I’m highly impressed, even though there are a lot of nasty things, that bug me. But the same is true to many countries. 

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Next stop, Vienna

Friday, March 25th, 2011

If one analysis my blog posts of the last months for a certain pattern, one will come to the conclusion, that I’m moving through Europe in even 3-month intervals and that this keeps me too busy to write about anything else. That’s about right. After spending some time composing and soul-searching in Reykjavík (the place, which comes closest to be called home. Emotionally, if not technically), I followed one of my over-abundant intuitions and started a course in landscape planning/architecture at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna, Austria. That’s where I am now.
While I was as surprised about  my sudden decision as my friends and family were, I have good reasons. Facing a future with less to no oil, heavily increasing energy prices and rapid environmental changes, I felt I have to play a role in the transition from the petroleum age to the post-petroleum age. Oil will run out whatever we attempt, but how we (as a species or human civilisation) cope, is up to us. I’m convinced that a smart and artistic design of the future will not only limit the devastating impact of climate change and peak oil, but even create a more desirable world. Studying landscape planning seemed to be a good choice, to equip myself with some important transition knowledge and skills.
So far, I’m very excited about Vienna and the University. I’m not writing a review here, so come and visit this place (but please, don’t take the plane). This said, I miss the freedom and the light of the North. Wishing to be in another place than the one I’m in seems to be the one constant of my life in the last couple of years.

solo debut

Thursday, May 13th, 2010

On Thursday, 27th May, I’ll give my debut as an solo artists, performing own songs and compositions as well as a live electronic performance. Besides a fantastic band (Maria Finkelmeier, Venla Hinnemo, Leyli Afsahi, Jonathan Börlin, Johan Petterson, Patrick Anderson, Davod Basri, Vanessa Martinez, Johan Bertilsson), the concert will feature Lindie Boström doing lights and visuals and a dance performance by Tore Alsegård.

Black Box, Piteå, 27th may 10, 9 pm

sonification of a paper plant

Friday, March 26th, 2010

Piteå is surrounded by two paper plants, which on same days smells like… hard to explain… I tried to make this unique smell audible…

(the smell of) kappa by Johann Strube

new song: bakom brus

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

Since I moved to Sweden, I engaged in composition a lot. Therefore, I like to share one piece of mine with you. “bakom brus” (swedish, “behind noise”) is a piece for noise generator and friends, which I wrote for my composition class with Johan Samskog (Stockholm). Tack för kritiken och synpunkter.  Hope you enjoy it.

bakom brus by Johann Strube